Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
schools have pledged their support for the boycott, and both the national education association and the american federation of teachers, have also given their endorsement. observers say the garfield boycott could mark a significant revolt to date against the obama administration's embrace of standardized testing. those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!,", the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. and dramatic film portraying the last day of oscar grant's life won top honors at the sundance film festival. directed by first-time filmmaker, 26-year-old ryan coogler, "fruitvale" tells the story of oscar grant, the 22- year-old bay area resident who was shot to death by a bay area rapid transit police officer. the film begins with real cellphone footage of the police shooting and then dramatically retells the last hours of his life. this is a clip from the film when grant speaks with his mother about plans for new year's eve. >> you guys have plans for the night? >> nothing major. meet up with the fellows. head out to the city. >> why don't you take
are not accessible -- educated about contraception and sex education. we have to look at these larger issues. >> i want to thank you for this film. lana wilson and martha shane made, "after tiller" that premiered this week at the sundance film festival on this 40th anniversary of the supreme court ruling of roe v. wade. when we come back, we go back and then go forward. we go back 50 years to a supreme court decision that guaranteed the right of everyone in the u.s. to a lawyer in criminal cases. what does that mean today? we follow a group of young, dedicated lawyers in the deep south fighting to defend those who cannot afford to hire their own lawyers. stay with us. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!,", the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from the sundance film festival in park city, utah. we turn now to a new film that looks at the struggles of public defenders -- lawyers who dedicate themselves to representing the poor. in some states, it's estimated 80% of people facing felony charges cannot afford to hire their own lawyers. often the lawy
. this is renowned author, educator and political activist angela davis who spoke last night, founder of the group critical resistance, a grassroots effort to in the prison industrial complex. davis voiced support for president obama, the said much work needs to be done. >> let me say this time around we cannot subordinate our aspirations and our hopes to presidential the agendas. our passionate support for president barack obama and it is wonderful that we can say for the second time, president barack obama, and we support him and are passionate about that support. but that support should also be expressed in our determination to raise issues that have largely been ignored or not appropriately addressed by the administration. and let me say that we are aware that we should be celebrating, critically celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. [applause] there should be massive celebrations this year. what has happened other than the film "lincoln"? and of course with 2.5 million people behind bars today, the prison system, the immigrant detention system are terrible remain
that are the highest risk of poor health are those with poor resources, poor financial resources, poor educational resources, because they may not make good judgments or have access to health care when it's very essential, or when it's crucial in prevention of progression of an illness. david bennett: but for many people in the world, their demands in terms of health are mu more modest. the people who face hunger, who face the threat of disease constantly, for them, survival is really health. to see the very quiet, subtle way in which communities can pull together is really quite remarkable. if we have that very broad definition, then everything becomes health. if we look only at certain narrowly defined diseases, we miss somehow the whole interaction that makes up the human being. the whole interaction that makes up the health of a human being begins with a genetic map. dean hamer: dna is like a blueprint that determines not t only our physical bodie, but also, at least in part, our brains. and our brains, of course, are what control our behavior, and so, although it surprises some people, our ge
on the road, visiting farmers and chefs, taking produce from one to the other, and educating both parties along the way. >> may need a look at the progress of a particular crop or report back, maybe some feedback, to the farmer about how the chefs are using it or what they might be looking for in the near future. >> in many ways, produce express and people like jim mills are the link between 1,300 different restaurants in northern california and produce from all over the golden state. today's visit took us to del rio botanical farm in yolo county, where suzanne peabody ashworth was keen to get reaurants to start trying the fresh fava beans and greens she's growing. >> so we'll take some of these greens into a couple of restaurants this morning and see what the chefs want to do with them. in sacramento, there's been an explosion of restaurants over the past 4 or 5 years in our capital. again, sacramento, california, agriculture, fruits and vegetables--there's a very bice link there and the interest that my customers have in this produce. >> we call at 5:30 in the morning and get the normal
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)